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Here is what Florida law says about aggravated assault

On Behalf of | Aug 4, 2021 | Criminal Defense

When you are facing criminal charges, it is often not clear what the charges imply and the potential consequences you could face. One thing for sure, however, is battery or felony charges attract stiff penalties in Florida. And the potential penalties for aggravated battery are even more severe.

An assault becomes aggravated when the offender uses a deadly weapon against their victim. This is a more severe form of assault. For instance, threatening to hit your neighbor for letting their pet trespass into your property could be an assault. On the other hand, threatening to hit your neighbor while holding a baseball bat could be considered an aggravated assault.

So what amounts to aggravated assault in Florida?

Aggravated assault, as already mentioned, is a more serious form of assault. Thus, an aggravated assault, according to Florida laws, amounts to one of the following:

  • Using a deadly weapon without the intent to kill the other party
  • Assaulting the other party with the intent of committing another felony

It is important to understand that an assault with a deadly weapon does not necessarily imply the use of a firearm. Rather, a deadly weapon refers to anything that can be used to cause significant bodily harm. A deadly weapon can include a knife, a baseball bat, a broken bottle or even a vehicle.

In Florida, you can also be charged with an aggravated assault if you committed the offense with the intent of committing another felony. This means that if you assaulted another person in order to commit another felony crime, you could be charged with aggravated assault. Examples of such felonies could include robbery and kidnapping, sexual assault or murder.

Penalties for aggravated assault in Florida

An aggravated assault is classified as a third-degree felony in Florida. This kind of offense can earn you up to five years in jail, probation and/or $5,000 in fine. That said, the penalties can be severe depending on the circumstances of your case.

Facing aggravated assault charges can severely impact your personal as well as professional life. Understanding your legal rights and options can help you figure out how to defend yourself and get a favorable outcome for your case.